Highlight from the Berkeley Wellness Letter: The Appeal of a Peel

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When you remove the peel or skin from fruits and vegetables, you lose a lot of nutrition, since it’s a concentrated source of fiber, vitamins, minerals, and potentially beneficial phytochemicals. The pigments in produce are healthful, and the skins or peels are often the most colorful part. Vegetable peels or skins are particularly good sources of insoluble fiber, which helps prevent constipation. Some peels, notably apple, are rich in pectin, a soluble fiber that helps lower blood cholesterol and control blood sugar. Apple peels seem to have an anti-cancer effect as well.

Read more in the Berkeley Wellness Letter.

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The FruitGuys Magazine is your source for workplace culture, trends, and healthy living. Previously known as The FruitGuys Almanac, the Magazine began in 2007. Editors and contributors include nationally known journalists and food writers. Submissions and suggestions can be sent to the editor.