Hartland Cherries: Kauffman’s Fruit Farm

By Heidi Lewis

How many people say “worth two in the bush!” when they enter the town  limits of Bird-in-Hand in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania? We don’t know,  but FruitGuys buyer Jessica says it when she heads to Bird-in-Hand to talk  with Kauffman’s Fruit Farm about their summer fruit.

Kauffman’s Fruit Farm was started in 1911 by Amos Kauffman and is  still run by members of the 3rd, 4th, and 5th generations. Over the last  century, the extended Kauffman family has stayed abreast of changing  consumer needs and thrived. They also have a market on Route 340  offering many Pennsylvania Dutch country treats and staples.

The farm’s 92 acres consist mostly of apples (50 varieties) and peaches (35  acres) and include seven acres of cherries, pears, and plums. This week’s  Regional TakeHome case features some of Kauffman’s Hartland cherries.  “We grow more Hartland than any other cherry,” says Mike Kauffman.  Hartlands are a mid-cherry-season cherry, which means they’re available  for a fleetingly short time, and as a result are prized by cherry lovers.

“They are a great tasting cherry, a little deeper and less sweet than the  Bing,” says Mike. Bings tend to be the benchmark that most fresh sweet  cherries are held to, but Hartlands have their own place in the heart of  Lancaster County.

Preparation: Pit cherries the old-fashioned way (with your mouth, being  careful not to swallow the pit); use a handheld pitter; or carefully slice and  de-pit with the tip of a paring knife. Cherry pit–spitting manners may vary  from family to family—but a pair of cherries over the ears is in fashion  everywhere.

Storage: If your cherries last uneaten for more than a day, store unwashed  in a plastic bag in the fridge for a week or so. When ready to use, rinse  and let warm to room temperature for best flavor. (Although they’re also  great pitted and frozen for a refreshing treat in the hot summer months!)

Share this post

Magazine Search

Recent The FruitLife articles:

At Full Belly Farm, plastic mulch has helped save water, energy, and soil
April 24, 2015
Warm winters could mean less fruit harvested in California
April 23, 2015
Orange you glad you threw a citrus-tasting party?
January 6, 2015

More recent articles:

How to break the stress cycle
May 21, 2015
Food:
April 28, 2015
Safety is top concern for bicycle commute
April 27, 2015
April 27, 2015
Sports leagues help you get fit and make friends
April 24, 2015
Conserve your budget, conserve the earth
April 23, 2015
Grants awarded to small sustainable farms
April 23, 2015
Happy Administrative Professionals Week!
April 22, 2015
The harder your workout, the bigger your health benefits
March 25, 2015
How to keep restaurant work lunches from derailing your diet
March 25, 2015

Sign up for the monthly newsletter

 

About Us

The FruitGuys Magazine is your source for workplace culture, trends, and healthy living. Previously known as The FruitGuys Almanac, the Magazine began in 2007. Editors and contributors include nationally known journalists and food writers. Submissions and suggestions can be sent to the editor.