How To Roast Garlic

Recipes by The FruitGuys

2 methods: For both methods, preheat oven to 350 °F.

Method 1—Individual Cloves:
This method is more time-consuming up front, but cooks faster and yields more garlic.

  • Remove outer skins and break apart garlic head or heads. Separate out the cloves, and discard any loose skin, leaving on their “jackets,” or immediate layer of skin. Use a paring knife to trim off the tough edge (the non-tapered end) of each clove.
  • Place trimmed cloves in a bowl and drizzle with enough olive oil to lightly and evenly coat, then spread out on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake until cloves yield to gentle pressure, usually 25–45 minutes depending on clove size.
  • Let cool, squeeze roasted garlic from each clove skin, and use as a spread, toss with pasta, or add to a variety of recipes.

Method 2—Whole Head:
This method takes a bit longer but is nice if presentation is a factor.

  • Remove any loose outer pieces of skin, but keep garlic head intact. Slice off the top (tapered) end of the garlic head (about 1/2 inch, exposing the tops of the individual cloves). Put head in the center of a sheet of foil, drizzle olive oil on top, and rub gently to distribute evenly.
  • Sprinkle lightly with salt, and gather foil up around bulb into a pouch (you can usually fit 1 to 3 heads in a sheet of foil). Place in the oven and bake until a paring knife slides easily into a clove—usually 35–60 minutes, depending on clove size (if exposed garlic is browning too quickly, reduce heat—don’t let it burn!).
  • Roasted heads may be served warm or at room temperature. Garlic can be scooped out with small spoons or knives and spread on bread, or served with bruschetta, cheese, olives, etc.

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The FruitGuys Magazine is your source for workplace culture, trends, and healthy living. Previously known as The FruitGuys Almanac, the Magazine began in 2007. Editors and contributors include nationally known journalists and food writers. Submissions and suggestions can be sent to the editor.