Zucchini and Fellini

Share this post

Zucchini and fellini
By Heidi Lewis
Martin Scorsese calls the Italian film classic La Strada
“A poetic picture—it’s about the road of life.” Federico
Fellini’s 1954 film is known as a powerful rumination
on love and hate. The devastating, beautiful story follows a triangle of
itinerate circus performers, the strong man (Anthony Quinn), the clown
(Richard Basehart), and the gentle Gelsomina (Giulietta Masina). Giulietta
was Fellini’s wife and muse and was called “the female Chaplin” by many,
and was nicknamed “Lo Spippolo” by her husband—argot meaning any
small thing that inspires tenderness.
And like Giulietta, zucchini adds an inspiring touch when it plays a
starring role in Italian cooking. This tender vegetable is very adaptable
and receptive to flavors, and Italian cuisine is extremely rich with ways
to prepare zucchini. It takes well to cheeses, herbs, and other veggies
like tomatoes. It’s delicious baked in a zucchine al forno from Lombardia
with olives and capers, or stuffed, as they do in summertime Sardinia. It’s
delightful in a tart—tortino di zucchini—or prepared as the familiar crispy
zucchini stick treats, í  la sports bar.
Zucca means squash or gourd in Italian, with the diminutive zucchino
becoming the plural zucchini. Although refined in Italy, the zucchini plant
originates from the Americas, and was likely taken back to Europe by
early explorers. Varieties such as Striato di Napoli (striped of Naples) and
Zucchino Rampicante (climbing zucchini) first began appearing in turn-of-
the-last-century American seed catalogs, likely in step with newcomers
from Italy.
The dense sweet flesh of zucchini is rich in nutrients, especially manganese
and vitamin C. One cup of cooked zukes contains 1.64g of protein and
.15g of omega-3 fatty acids. Zucchini is a nutritious, versatile veggie that
brings a lot of fun, flavor, and star-quality to any table. Buon appetito!
Preparation: Rinse before preparing, and trim the ends. No need to peel.
Storage: Zukes are tender and bruise easily, so handle carefully. Store in a
bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. Use within one week.

Martin Scorsese calls the Italian film classic La Strada “A poetic picture—it’s about the road of life.” Federico  Fellini’s 1954 film is known as a powerful rumination  on love and hate. The devastating, beautiful story follows a triangle of  itinerate circus performers, the strong man (Anthony Quinn), the clown  (Richard Basehart), and the gentle Gelsomina (Giulietta Masina). Giulietta  was Fellini’s wife and muse and was called “the female Chaplin” by many,  and was nicknamed “Lo Spippolo” by her husband—argot meaning any  small thing that inspires tenderness.

zucchiniAnd like Giulietta, zucchini adds an inspiring touch when it plays a  starring role in Italian cooking. This tender vegetable is very adaptable  and receptive to flavors, and Italian cuisine is extremely rich with ways  to prepare zucchini. It takes well to cheeses, herbs, and other veggies  like tomatoes. It’s delicious baked in a zucchine al forno from Lombardia  with olives and capers, or stuffed, as they do in summertime Sardinia. It’s  delightful in a tart—tortino di zucchini—or prepared as the familiar crispy  zucchini stick treats, í  la sports bar.

Zucca means squash or gourd in Italian, with the diminutive zucchino becoming the plural zucchini. Although refined in Italy, the zucchini plant  originates from the Americas, and was likely taken back to Europe by  early explorers. Varieties such as Striato di Napoli (striped of Naples) and  Zucchino Rampicante (climbing zucchini) first began appearing in turn-of-the-last-century American seed catalogs, likely in step with newcomers  from Italy.

The dense sweet flesh of zucchini is rich in nutrients, especially manganese  and vitamin C. One cup of cooked zukes contains 1.64g of protein and  .15g of omega-3 fatty acids. Zucchini is a nutritious, versatile veggie that  brings a lot of fun, flavor, and star-quality to any table. Buon appetito!

Preparation: Rinse before preparing, and trim the ends. No need to peel.

Storage: Zukes are tender and bruise easily, so handle carefully. Store in a  bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator. Use within one week.

—By Heidi Lewis

 

Subscribe to the WEEKLY BITE

* indicates required

 

Recent Food articles:

History of the tomato
April 18, 2019
How to prepare Ataulfo mango
April 4, 2019
Making the most of citrus season
February 14, 2019
Three hearty soup recipes you can enjoy all month
February 4, 2019
Tempting winter fruits to brighten your weekly mix
January 31, 2019
Easy meal prep recipes you can eat all week
January 7, 2019
How to make latkes and applesauce
December 6, 2018
The food history of Thanksgiving
November 22, 2018
Winter and summer oranges
August 23, 2018
How to make vegetarian sushi at home
August 7, 2018

More recent articles:

Best onboarding practices
May 21, 2019
Quick, easy steps to spruce up your office space
May 14, 2019
Grilled portobello recipe
May 9, 2019
How to prepare physically and mentally for race day
May 9, 2019
Three simple ways to enjoy watermelon radishes
May 2, 2019
Beehives, swales, and vermicomposting, oh my!
April 29, 2019
Easy spring salad recipe
April 25, 2019
Reduce plastic use with these earth-friendly alternatives
April 22, 2019
Spring fruit varieties and how to enjoy them
April 16, 2019
How to make sure you’re getting enough iron in your diet
April 11, 2019

About Us

Our online magazine offers a taste of workplace culture, trends, and healthy living. It features recipes for easy, delicious work meals and tips on quick office workouts. It's also an opportunity to learn about our GoodWorks program, which helps those in need in our communities and supports small, sustainable farms.