How Sweet You Are

Recently I overheard someone at the gym recommending green apples over red ones because they supposedly contain less sugar. This seemed a strange idea, since sugar in fruit isn’t like added sugar in processed foods, so I decided to dig deeper. Is sugar in fruit bad for us? Do green apples have less sugar than red ones? Are some people avoiding fruits because they’re sweet? Numerous websites, blogs, and diets would seem to indicate yes. But not all sugars are created equal. The sugars in fruit are bound with beneficial nutrients and fiber that make fruit uniquely suited for the body to process and enjoy.

Eat the Peel: Apples’ Anti-Cancer Agents Are in the Skin

Highlight from the Berkeley Wellness Letter: The Appeal of a Peel

When you remove the peel or skin from fruits and vegetables, you lose a lot of nutrition, since it’s a concentrated source of fiber, vitamins, minerals, and potentially beneficial phytochemicals. The pigments in produce are healthful, and the skins or peels are often the most colorful part. Vegetable peels or skins are particularly good sources of insoluble fiber, which helps prevent constipation. Some peels, notably apple, are rich in pectin, a soluble fiber that helps lower blood cholesterol and control blood sugar. Apple peels seem to have an anti-cancer effect as well.

Read more in the Berkeley Wellness Letter.