The Midnight Diet

Eat Less and Eat Better

New Federal Dietary Guidelines Released

Every five years the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture update their guidelines for healthy eating. The 2010 dietary guidelines, released at the end of January 2011, offer more of the same advice as past ones: drink water instead of soda, cut back on salt, and eat more fruits and veggies.

Oh, and exercise a lot more. Enjoy your food, but eat less.

Highlight from the Berkeley Wellness Letter: The Appeal of a Peel

When you remove the peel or skin from fruits and vegetables, you lose a lot of nutrition, since it’s a concentrated source of fiber, vitamins, minerals, and potentially beneficial phytochemicals. The pigments in produce are healthful, and the skins or peels are often the most colorful part. Vegetable peels or skins are particularly good sources of insoluble fiber, which helps prevent constipation. Some peels, notably apple, are rich in pectin, a soluble fiber that helps lower blood cholesterol and control blood sugar. Apple peels seem to have an anti-cancer effect as well.

Read more in the Berkeley Wellness Letter.

We ♥ Fruit

February is American Heart Month. Not just the chocolate-filled, pink-foiled, "Will you be my valentine?" heart month, but the 10-oz muscle-that-pumps-blood-oxygen-and-nutrients-thoughout-your-body-so-you-can-live month. The Heart Association probably got February because it looks really good in red, but isn't every month heart month? And every day heart day? Your heart beats 60–100 times a minute depending on your age and exertion.